Tuesday, January 10, 2012

My First Kindle Book


Is that the simplest and most straightforward post title I’ve ever used or what?!

As one can imagine, I took the decision for my first Kindle book very seriously.  I read description after description, looked up books I have on my “[to] Read” list, considered, reconsidered, …and so on.  I felt like it should be a classic, like maybe my favorite book “Jane Eyre,” something I already love and read over and over again.  I thought maybe I should read a bestseller, something people are talking about right now so that I might join in on any conversations [which is the reason I read classics in the first place]. 

I had decided on “Invisible Cities” by Italo Calvino. 

I believe it was in my 2nd year of studio when the 3rd year had a studio on bridges with Smulevich.  I was fascinated by what they were doing and I love bridges [I should write on what that means to me someday].  If I remember correctly, they were to read “IC,” pick out a story from the book, and then construct a study model according to their interpretation of the reading.  I might totally be misremembering this project as I wasn’t in that studio, but I completely remember wishing I had been in it.

Back to Kindle, I was disappointed when I found out that I couldn’t get Calvino in Kindle format- it was reserved for Europe only or some such thing.

So back to searching for that one special pick…
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I put it to my Facebook community for suggestions for what the first book should be .


All good suggestions, I looked up the ones I wasn’t familiar with yet. 

I have been a fan of James Patterson and have some of his books in hardcover- I felt like I wanted something different.  I think it’s because although he writes well and several series, it’s difficult for me to keep up with a series.  For a time, I was trying to keep up with the Alex Cross series, and then I also liked the first two Woman’s Murder Club series, and then I couldn’t keep up with either.  I do recommend his “Cradle and All” book about a modern day immaculate conception claims- very interesting and surprising to me how it worked out. 

“The Hunger Games” had seemed the most intriguing when I had done my previous searching.  “Holiday in Stone Creek” for some reason probably wouldn’t have interested me had I come across it on my own, but looking into it from Maggie’s suggestion, I find myself curious.

I also enjoy Dean Koontz and Stephen King books.  I thought I might get the next in the Odd Thomas series... 
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I chose… tadah!  “The Devil in Pew Number Seven” by Rebecca Alonzo!

I downloaded it on January 1st, even though I have difficulty reading more than one personal reads at a time and I was still into Bevere’s “Lioness Arising.”

I heard about the book from listening to a Grounded podcast [Pop Culture and True Forgiveness, June 6, 2011, ~41:55] with guest Bob DeMoss.  I recommend the Grounded with Ryan Dobson (on Facebook) podcast and that's the link to their Facebook page, if that wasn't clear.

Amazon says: 2011 Retailers Choice Award winner!
Rebecca never felt safe as a child. In 1969, her father, Robert Nichols, moved to Sellerstown, North Carolina, to serve as a pastor. There he found a small community eager to welcome him—with one exception. Refusing to be driven away by acts of intimidation, Rebecca’s father stood his ground until one night when an armed man walked into the family’s kitchen . . . And Rebecca’s life was shattered. It is the amazing true saga of relentless persecution, one family’s faith and courage in the face of it, and a daughter whose parents taught her the power of forgiveness.

I think that last part about forgiveness, which was in pretty much all of the reader’s reviews, was the clincher.  Forgiving, myself and others, is something that I struggle with.  That it was a true horrific story that ends in forgiveness, how is that not intriguing? 

I started reading Alonzo on Sunday night, as I was close to finishing Bevere.  As I type this, I am on Chapter 5, “Under Seige,” which my Fire informs me is 21% of the book.  Alonzo has not disappointed so far and I doubt the story ever will.  I will be done with it shortly.

Check it out for yourself.  I usually don’t recommend a book until I’ve read it myself entirely, but I’m going ahead with this one.  Go for it.




I will probably get "The Hunger Games" and "Holiday..." after this.

Thank you for reading this post and happy reading of established authors!


P.S. if the links I post ever do not work, please let me know?  I try to check them out first myself but just in case.  And yes, please feel welcome to leave a comment at any time on any post about any thing- Mahalo!